The Best Book On Getting An IBanking Internship

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The following is a list of investment banks

1 Largest full-service investment banks 2 Financial conglomerates 3 Independent investment banks and large cap advisory firms 3.1 Private placement firms 4 Other advisory and capital markets firms 5 Notable former investment banks and brokerages 6 See also 7 Notes

The following are the largest full-service global investment banks; Full-service investment banks usually provides both advisory and financing banking services, as well as the sales, market making, and research on a broad array of financial products including equities, credit, rates, currency, commodities, and their derivatives:

Bank of America Merrill Lynch Barclays Capital Citigroup Credit Suisse Deutsche Bank Goldman Sachs JPMorgan Chase Morgan Stanley Nomura Securities UBS Wells Fargo Securities

Financial conglomerates – large financial-services conglomerates combine commercial banking and investment banking and sometimes insurance. Such combinations were common in Europe but illegal in the United States prior to passage of the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act of 1999. The following are large investment banking firms affiliated with large financial institutions (not previously listed above). The name of the investment banking affiliate is in parentheses, if noticeably distinct from the name of the parent bank.

ABN Amro[1] BBVA Banco Santander BB&T (BB&T Capital Markets) Bank of China (BOC International Holdings) Bank of Montreal (BMO Capital Markets) BNP Paribas Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBC World Markets) Commerzbank (Dresdner Kleinwort, Eurohypo) Crédit Agricole Daiwa Securities ING Group KBC Bank KeyCorp (KeyBanc Capital Markets) Kotak Mahindra Bank Lloyds Banking Group Macquarie Group Mizuho Financial Group Monte dei Paschi di Siena (MPS Finance) M&T Bank National Australia Bank Natixis PNC Financial Services Rabobank Royal Bank of Canada (RBC Capital Markets) Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS GBM) Sberbank Scotiabank (Scotia Capital) Société Générale (SG CIB) Standard Bank Standard Chartered Bank State Bank of India (SBI Capital Markets Limited) Stifel Financial (Stifel Nicolaus) SunTrust (Robinson Humphrey) Toronto-Dominion Bank (TD Securities) UniCredit (UBM)

Independent investment banks and large cap advisory firms – notable M&A advisors, brokerage firms and underwriters of securities that are not affiliated with commercial banks:

Allen & Company Arma Partners BBY Ltd Blackstone Group Brown Brothers Harriman Brown, Shipley & Co. Cantor Fitzgerald Capstone Partners Centerview Partners Close Brothers Group CLSA Collins Stewart Corporate Finance Associates Cowen Group Daewoo Securities Defoe Fournier & Cie. Duff & Phelps Europa Partners Evercore Partners FALCOM Financial Services FBR Capital Markets Financo Gleacher & Co. Greenhill & Co. Guggenheim Partners Harris Williams & Company Houlihan Lokey Howard & Zukin Imperial Capital Investec Investment Technology Group Keefe, Bruyette & Woods Ladenburg Thalmann Lazard Lincoln International M.M.Warburg & CO Marathon Capital Mediobanca Miller Buckfire & Co. Moelis & Company Morgan Keegan & Company N M Rothschild & Sons Needham and Company Newedge Oppenheimer & Co. Panmure Gordon Park Lane Perella Weinberg Partners Piper Jaffray Pottinger (Australia) Qatalyst Partners Raymond James Robert W. Baird & Company Sagent Advisors Sandler O’Neill + Partners Sherman & Company Stephens Inc. Thomas Weisel Partners Vermilion Partners William Blair & Company WR Hambrecht + Co

Private placement firms – private placement agents, including firms that specialize in fundraising for private equity funds:

Acap Financial Inc. Almeida Capital Atlantic-Pacific Capital Campbell Lutyens Cogent Partners C.P. Eaton Partners Fimeris (fka Fidequity) First Avenue Partners Genesis Capital Helix Associates J.P. Morgan Cazenove Magpar Monument Group Mvision Park Hill Group Probitas Partners Rodman & Renshaw Triago

Other advisory and capital markets firms – the following is a list of other boutique advisory firms and capital markets firms:

Aaron, Bell International Abaxas Group ACAP Financial Inc. Aforge Finance Akin Bay Company Ambrian Angle Advisors Aquaa Partners Arbor Advisors ArchPoint Partners Arena Group Avalon Group Ltd. Banca Leonardo Berenson & Company BG Capital BGR Capital & Trade Blackmont Capital Blaige & Company Blue Crown Funding Boenning & Scattergood Brescon Corporate Advisors Ltd. Brewin Dolphin Brown, Gibbons, Lang & Company Bryan, Garnier & Co Bryant Park Capital BTIG Bulger Capital Partners Business Development Asia Cain Brothers The Capital Corporation Carnegie, Wylie & Company Catalyst Corporate Finance CB Capital Partners Chardan Capital Markets Cipher Capital Clayton Capital Partners Collins Group Columbia West Capital Concorde Capital Confluence Advisors Consus Partner Cross Keys Capital Crowe Capital Markets CSG Partners D. A. Davidson & Co. DAK Group, Ltd. Dalmore Group Dawson James Securities Deal Strategy DecisionPoint International Defoe Capital Downer & Company Dresner Partners Equinet AG Espírito Santo Investment Eternus Capital Exane Fairmount Partners Ferris, Baker Watts First Princeton Advisors FMI Capital Advisors Freeman & Co. Gemini Partners Generation Equity Advisors Genuity Capital Markets Global Financial Services Co. Global M&A GmbH Golden Financial Investment Group Gordian Group Grace Matthews Granite Tower Capital Greenberg Advisors Greif & Co. Gridley & Co. Grisons Peak GrowthPoint Technology Partners HarborLight Capital Group HDL Capital Corporation HFP Capital Markets Hilco Corporate Finance Hina Group HNC Saudi Arabia Hovde Indigo Capital Holding InnoVative Capital Intellian Capital Advisors Janney Montgomery Scott Jesup & Lamont JMP Securities Jones Trading Jordan, Knauff & Company KBR Corporate Finance Kerr Financial Corporation Lancaster Pollard Lane Berry Leerink Swann Leonardo & Co. M3 Capital Partners Madison Street Capital Madison Williams and Company Marlin & Associates Matthews Asia Funds Maxim Group McColl Partners McGladrey Capital Markets McLean Group Merchant Securities Messier Partner Midtown Partners Montgomery & Co. Multinational Strategic Financing National Securities Newforth Partners Newstock Capital Old Park Lane Capital Orion Capital Group OwlRock Capital, LLC Pacific Growth Equities Pacific Road Corporate Finance Peachtree Capital Advisors Peter J. Solomon Company Pharus Advisors Potomac Company PrinceRidge Group Pritchard Capital Partners Provident Healthcare Partners Quest Profin Advisor Pvt. Ltd., INDIA R.G. Wuelfing & Associates Remington Financial Group Revolution Partners RHB Investment Bank Berhad ROTH Capital Partners Rutberg & Co. Sagacious Financial Services Ltd. Salman Partners Scott-Macon, Ltd. Seymour Pierce Sheshunoff Management Services Signal Hill Capital Group Siemer & Associates Source Capital Group Southwest Securities Sonenshine Partners Spurrier Capital Partners Stone Key Partners Stonepine Advisors Sucsy, Fischer & Company Thurmond & Company Transparent Value Universalis Capital (Универсалис Капитал) Vector Casa de Bolsa Versailles Group, Ltd. Viant Group Viriathus Capital Woodbridge Group Woodside Capital Partners Wyatt Matas & Associates Wynston Hill Capital

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The following is an excerpt from The Opportune Time, a free weekly newsletter edited by Lee Jackson.  If you like what you see below, please visit The OT website and subscribe.

As far as the global political landscape, investors also should continue to monitor nuclear activities, the most recent development being India’s test-firing of a ballistic missile. While the test-firing certainly has implications for Chinese/Indian relations, because the missile was capable of reaching Beijing and Shanghai, I think all the implications are more far-REACHING. The negotiations between the West and Iran over the latter’s nuclear program and the failed launch of a rocket in North Korea two weeks ago has returned nuclear security to the international forefront. I think the most probable risk, albeit not the most catastrophic risk, posed by India’s missile test last week is not war between India and its neighbor(s), but rather a disruption of negotiations with Iran.

India’s test launch may impact diplomacy with Iran in two main ways. First, the launch may complicate talks between U.S. and E.U. officials and Iranian representatives next month. Iranian officials now can arrive at next month’s meeting with fresh complaints about how the U.S. and the E.U. have been selectively enforcing their nuclear proliferation policies.

Second, India has been more resistant than other Asian nations to U.S. calls to reduce purchases of Iranian oil. In the first quarter of this year, India’s imports of Iranian oil rose almost 25% year-over-year (YoY). However, India’s imports of Iranian oil have been declining steadily from their peak in January, when India overtook China as the largest importer of Iranian oil. India surpassed China also in part due to China’s import reduction of 40% YoY in the first quarter. In addition, India actively has been circumventing sanctions against the Iranian central bank. The sanctions against the Iranian central bank prevent buyers of Iranian crude oil from paying with U.S. dollars and euros. As such, India has been paying in rupees, and even exporting commodities, such as wheat, to barter with Iran for crude. Perhaps ironically, China has been paying for Iranian crude oil with its currency the yuan and agricultural and consumer products too. U.S. and E.U. officials have not voiced meaningful opposition to India’s missile test. But India may have been flexing its muscles partly to dissuade the Western world from sanctioning the Indian economy, which needs Iran to satisfy its demand for energy at today’s prices.

Did you like what you read? Read the full newsletter here.

 

  • NATURAL Gas May Rally Near-Term • 1
  • The IMF Rescues RISK Assets • 3
  • Are the USD & JPY Buys Ahead of the FOMC & BOJ? • 3
  • Watch ELECTIONS in Greece & France • 6
  • A Long-Range Missile with Far-REACHING Implications • 7
  • STOCKS: Earnings Season & Clash of the Tech Titans • 8

 

Best,

Lee Jackson

Editor of The Opportune Time lee@theopportunetime.com www.theopportunetime.com

DISCLAIMER: The information, tools and material presented herein are provided for informational purposes only and are not to be used or considered as an offer or a solicitation to sell or an offer or solicitation to buy or subscribe for securities, investment products or other financial instruments, nor to constitute any advice or recommendation with respect to such securities, investment products or other financial instruments. This communication is prepared for general circulation. It does not have regard to the specific investment objectives, financial situation and the particular needs of any specific person who may receive this communication. You should independently evaluate particular investments and consult an independent financial adviser before making any investments or entering into any transaction in relation to any securities mentioned in this communication. The information contained herein is not necessarily complete and its accuracy is not guaranteed by The Opportune Time, LLC, or IBanking Internship or Hyperink its operating entity or the principals therein. If you have received this communication in error, please notify the author immediately by electronic mail. Neither the information nor any opinion expressed herein constitutes a solicitation for the purchase of any future or security referred to in this communication. The views expressed herein are solely those of The Opportune Time, LLC as of the date of this communication and are subject to change without notice. Principals of The Opportune Time, LLC may or may not hold or be short of securities discussed herein, or of any other securities, at any time.

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The following is an excerpt from The Opportune Time, a free weekly newsletter edited by Lee Jackson.  If you like what you see below, please visit The OT website and subscribe.

Another reason to buy the USD and the JPY over the next few days is euro area political risk. In my view, the most important upcoming events regarding the European debt crisis are political with possible economic consequences. For one, Parliamentary ELECTIONS in Greece are scheduled to occur on May 6th, and according to the most recent polls, anti-bailout parties are projected to win at least as many seats as pro-bailout parties. Anti-bailout lawmakers may gain enough seats to block additional budget cuts in the legislature. Moreover, there are two pro-bailout parties, compared to a total of as many as nine other parties that are projected to win seats. Such a multiparty legislature is untraditional in Greece, and lawmakers may find cooperation among eleven parties challenging.

An unusually fragmented political environment might lead the Greek government to a disorderly default, especially if Greece needs a third bailout, as many analysts now expect. Note that Greece’s anti-bailout political parties are not necessarily anti-euro, and Greek politicians may vote to stay in the common currency, even if a default were to happen. However, I suspect markets would force Greece out of the currency union via bank runs, which have been happening gradually over the past several months. I will return to the bank run problem at a later date.

Perhaps the largest political risk related to the European debt crisis emanates from the euro area’s second-largest economy. France held first-round presidential elections yesterday, and as expected, Francois Hollande, the candidate representing the relatively liberal Socialist Party, received about 29% of the vote, versus the incumbent President (Pres.) Nicolas Sarkozy of the relatively conservative Union for a Popular Movement Party, who received about 27% of the vote. Although the results were expected, they were unusual in the context of French political history. An incumbent French president has not lost a first-round election in five decades, and far-right National Front Party (NFP) leader Marine Le Pen garnered the largest percentage of the first-round vote ever by an NFP candidate. Political analysts partially attribute Le Pen’s support from 20% of the electorate to general disillusionment with France’s two major political parties amid the European debt crisis.

According to the most recent polls, Hollande is projected to defeat Pres. Sarkozy in the final round of voting on May 6th by as wide as a double-digit percentage point margin. Barring an extraordinary event, Hollande is likely to win, which may lead to a significant shift in political dynamics in the euro area. To date, Pres. Sarkozy and German Chancellor (Chanc.) Angela Merkel, the leaders of the euro area’s two largest economies, have been fairly cooperative when working toward solutions to the European debt crisis. However, given his campaign rhetoric, Hollande may be less willing to cooperate with Chanc. Merkel. Hollande has blamed much of the European debt crisis on the European Central Bank (ECB) not acting aggressively enough. One never knows how a politician’s actions in office will differ from their campaign rhetoric, but I imagine Hollande would be less willing to work with German and E.U. officials than his predecessor. I do expect Hollande to cooperate to a certain degree, only to a lesser degree than his predecessor. But above all, I would view Hollande’s election as a manifestation of the long-term trend of countries in the E.U. placing their domestic interests ahead of the collective interests of the euro area.

Did you like what you read? Read the full newsletter here.

 

  • NATURAL Gas May Rally Near-Term • 1
  • The IMF Rescues RISK Assets • 3
  • Are the USD & JPY Buys Ahead of the FOMC & BOJ? • 3
  • Watch ELECTIONS in Greece & France • 6
  • A Long-Range Missile with Far-REACHING Implications • 7
  • STOCKS: Earnings Season & Clash of the Tech Titans • 8

 

Best,

Lee Jackson

Editor of The Opportune Time lee@theopportunetime.com www.theopportunetime.com

DISCLAIMER: The information, tools and material presented herein are provided for informational purposes only and are not to be used or considered as an offer or a solicitation to sell or an offer or solicitation to buy or subscribe for securities, investment products or other financial instruments, nor to constitute any advice or recommendation with respect to such securities, investment products or other financial instruments. This communication is prepared for general circulation. It does not have regard to the specific investment objectives, financial situation and the particular needs of any specific person who may receive this communication. You should independently evaluate particular investments and consult an independent financial adviser before making any investments or entering into any transaction in relation to any securities mentioned in this communication. The information contained herein is not necessarily complete and its accuracy is not guaranteed by The Opportune Time, LLC, or IBanking Internship or Hyperink its operating entity or the principals therein. If you have received this communication in error, please notify the author immediately by electronic mail. Neither the information nor any opinion expressed herein constitutes a solicitation for the purchase of any future or security referred to in this communication. The views expressed herein are solely those of The Opportune Time, LLC as of the date of this communication and are subject to change without notice. Principals of The Opportune Time, LLC may or may not hold or be short of securities discussed herein, or of any other securities, at any time.

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